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Mathematics: Maths

A Selection of Mathematics Books

The Four Pillars of Geometry

Many people think there is only one "right" way to teach geometry. For two millennia, the "right" way was Euclid's way, and it is still good in many respects. But in the 1950s the cry "Down with triangles!" was heard in France and new geometry books appeared, packed with linear algebra but with no diagrams. Was this the new "right" way, or was the "right" way something else again, perhaps transformation groups? In this book, I wish to show that geometry can be developed in four fundamentally different ways, and that all should be used if the subject is to be shown in all its splendor. Euclid-style construction and axiomatics seem the best way to start, but linear algebra smooths the later stages by replacing some tortuous arguments by simple calculations. And how can one avoid projective geometry? It not only explains why objects look the way they do; it also explains why geometry is entangled with algebra. Finally, one needs to know that there is not one geometry, but many, and transformation groups are the best way to distinguish between them.

ProQuest eBook Central: Search for eBooks here

Ebook Central

eBooks

Accessing eBooks Part 2

Finding Books in the Library

You can go to the book shelves and browse the Library collection using the following Call Numbers:

510 Mathematics
511 General principles of mathematics
512 Algebra, number theory
513 Arithmetic
514 Topology
515 Analysis
516 Geometry
519 Probabilities & applied mathematics